Direct Sow Vs Indoors Garden Seed Starting

Learning which seeds respond to direct sow vs indoor garden seed starting can greatly determine your garden growing success.

Direct Sow Vs Indoors Garden Seed Starting

Make sure you like The Homestead Survival  and Homestead Survival  Facebook,  and explore our  PINTEREST BOARDS  for innovative ways you can become self-sufficient on a budget.

Growing plants and vegetables early in the spring season is perfect timing, as light and the basic equipment for growing is all that is needed. For first timers, start with just a few, including a couple of indoor crops, such as tomatoes and basil. Sun is a must-have, and, if not outside under the sunshine, get a sunlamp for indoors and water regularly.

There are six steps: find the perfect containers, prepping the soil, start planting the seeds, watering, shining, and moving seedlings outdoors (if necessary).

Direct sowing is exactly what it means: directly outside in the soil. It prevents the hassle of moving them from indoors and some plants can start in the chill before the warmth. To sow is to scatter the seeds all over to grow. For others, indoor gardening begins because of the winter and to get a head start on the harvest. Plus, where one lives to grow the plants depends whether it’s necessary. If one lives in South California or South Florida, having them outside from the start is probable.

If one lives in the Midwest and North, such as Minnesota or anywhere in Central Canada, such as Saskatchewan, you have to start indoors because of the cold winter, which can be brutal.

Here’s a list of crops that can be directly sowed and those that are better off starting indoors.

Direct Sow: Most Root Crops & Cold-Hardy Plants

• Artichoke

• Arugula

• Asparagus

• Beans

• Beets

• Broccoli

• Brussels Sprouts

• Cabbage

• Carrots

• Cauliflower

• Cucumber

• Endive

• Garlic

• Gourds

• Kale

• Kohlrabi

• Leeks

• Lettuce

• Mesclun Greens

• Melon

• Okra

• Onions

• Parsnips

• Peas

• Pumpkins

• Radicchio

• Radish

• Rhubarb

• Rutabaga

• Shallots

• Spinach

• Squash

• Swiss Chard

• Turnips

• Zucchini

• Basil

• Borage

• Chicory

• Chives

• Cilantro

• Dill

• Garlic Chives

• Mint

• Parsley

• Savory

• Tarragon

Start Indoors: Tender Varieties & Heat-Loving Plants

• Arugula

• Beans

• Bok Choy

• Broccoli

• Brussels Sprouts

• Cabbage

• Cauliflower

• Celery

• Collard Greens

• Cucumber

• Eggplant

• Endive

• Gourds

• Lettuce

• Kale

• Leeks

• Lettuce

• Mesclum Greens

• Melons

• Mustard Greens

• Okra

• Onions

• Peppers

• Pumpkin

• Radicchio

• Squash

• Tomatillo

• Tomato

• Zucchini

• Basil

• Chervil

• Cilantro

• Dill

• Garlic Chives

• Lemon Balm

• Lovage

• Marjoram

• Mint

• Oregano

• Parsley

• Rosemary

• Sage

• Savory

• Tarragon

• Thyme

Make sure, when planting the seeds, you know which plant will be able to survive outside or if it’s better inside. It varies whether it needs all the warmth it can get, or if it handles well in the cold. They need to be cared for, regardless, every day with water, proper soil, and removal of any pests that could harm them. Make sure you know what seedlings are so they are not taken out as weeds, which are different. In fact, the seed packets should inform what is the proper management for what is being grown. Both direct sowing and indoor growing are popular; it is all about preference. If done accordingly, the plants and vegetables will be perfect and ripe to consume fresh at your home.

 

You may also like...