Make a Mini Root Cellar in Your Backyard in 2 Hours

See how to make a mini root cellar in your backyard in 2 hours.
For those who haven’t heard of or seen a root cellar before, it is actually a type of structure built partially underground or underground. This is used for storing fruits, vegetables, and other types of food.

See how to make a mini root cellar in your backyard in 2 hours. For those who haven’t heard of or seen a root cellar before, it is actually a type of structure built partially underground or underground. This is used for storing fruits, vegetables, and other types of food. According to Elliston Root Cellar, root cellaring is the science or art of preservation of any kind of food supply. The true origin of root cellaring and root cellars probably got lost in history. But, there is no doubt that during the time of the early ancestors of the human race, they had to practice some kind of preservation in root cellars in order to survive. Common Sense Home states that there are five key elements required when making your own root cellar. The first one is ventilation. There are some produce that emit ethylene gas that can lead to spoilage of other produce. There is also a higher risk of mold growth inside a tightly sealed cellar. It is important to ensure that fresh air gets in, while stale air gets out, with air circulating properly around the produce. The soil also insulates and sustains a cool temperature. Gravel floor or packed earth floor is a better option than concrete to keep moisture levels high. Light can also trigger sprouting. If the root cellar has a window, this should be covered and lights should never be left on. A high level of humidity of 85% to 95% can prevent the produce from drying out. Excessively high humidity for the produce may lead to rusting of canning jar lids. It is a must to check the lids and rotate the stock if canned goods are stored in your root cellar. Finally, bins and wood shelving are naturally antibacterial. Wood can also conduct heat slower than metal and it won’t rust. Don’t use treated wood and opt for naturally rot resistant ones. In this article, Next Preppers shares more information about root cellars together with steps on how you can create your own for whatever purpose or reason you might have.

According to Elliston Root Cellar, root cellaring is the science or art of preservation of any kind of food supply. The true origin of root cellaring and root cellars probably got lost in history. But, there is no doubt that during the time of the early ancestors of the human race, they had to practice some kind of preservation in root cellars in order to survive.

Common Sense Home states that there are five key elements required when making your own root cellar. The first one is ventilation. There are some produce that emit ethylene gas that can lead to spoilage of other produce.

There is also a higher risk of mold growth inside a tightly sealed cellar. It is important to ensure that fresh air gets in, while stale air gets out, with air circulating properly around the produce. The soil also insulates and sustains a cool temperature. Gravel floor or packed earth floor is a better option than concrete to keep moisture levels high.

Light can also trigger sprouting. If the root cellar has a window, this should be covered and lights should never be left on. A high level of humidity of 85% to 95% can prevent the produce from drying out.

Excessively high humidity for the produce may lead to rusting of canning jar lids. It is a must to check the lids and rotate the stock if canned goods are stored in your root cellar. Finally, bins and wood shelving are naturally antibacterial.

Wood can also conduct heat slower than metal and it won’t rust. Don’t use treated wood and opt for naturally rot resistant ones.
In this article, Next Preppers shares more information about root cellars together with steps on how you can create your own for whatever purpose or reason you might have.

http://www.nextpreppers.com/2019/02/08/how-to-make-a-mini-root-cellar-in-your-backyard-in-less-than-two-hours-once-upon-a-time-root-cellars-were-the-only-way-people-had-to-preserve-their-food/

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